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  • When the van door slammed on Offreds future at the end of «The Handmaids Tale», readers had no way of telling what lay ahead. In this electrifying sequel, Margaret Atwood picks up the story fifteen years after Offred stepped into the unknown, with the explosive testaments of three female narrators from Gilead.

  • T his beautifully illustrated collection honoring one hundred exceptional feminist saints throughout history is sure to inspire women and men alike. A new set of role models and heroes--matron saints--for the feminist future.-- The New York Times Book Review The women in this book . . . blazed trails where none existed before.-- The Guardian In this luminous volume, New York Times bestselling writer Julia Pierpont and artist Manjit Thapp match short, vibrant, and surprising biographies with stunning full-color portraits of secular female saints: champions of strength and progress. These women broke ground, broke ceilings, and broke molds--including Maya Angelou Jane Austen Ruby Bridges Rachel Carson Shirley Chisholm Marie Curie & Irène Joliot Curie Isadora Duncan Amelia Earhart Artemisia Gentileschi Grace Hopper Dolores Huerta Frida Kahlo Billie Jean King Audre Lorde Wilma Mankiller Toni Morrison Michelle Obama Sandra Day OConnor Sally Ride Eleanor Roosevelt Margaret Sanger Sappho Nina Simone Gloria Steinem Kanno Sugako Harriet Tubman Mae West Virginia Woolf Malala Yousafzai Open to any page and find daily inspiration and lasting delight. Praise for The Little Book of Feminist Saints A whistle-stop tour of inspiring women . . . [The artwork] deserves to be framed in every womans living room. -- Diva Short, snappy and inspiring [with] glorious visuals. -- Psychologies This beautifully illustrated collection offers daily inspiration and humorous anecdotes to remind you why we worship these women so. -- Hello Giggles An enticing collection . . . Pierponts pithy write-ups are accompanied by Thapps funky, wonderfully expressive color illustrations, making for an engaging picture-book experience for adults. . . . Bold and sassy . . . required reading for any seeking to broaden their historical knowledge. -- Kirkus Reviews (starred review) Small enough to tuck into a bag, this delightful book offers instant inspiration. -- BookPage

  • With a foreword by Athene Donald, Professor of Experimental Physics, University of Cambridge and Master of Churchill College. Ten Women Who Changed Science tells the moving stories of the physicists, biologists, chemists, astronomers and doctors who helped to shape our world with their extraordinary breakthroughs and inventions, and outlines their remarkable achievements. These scientists overcame significant obstacles, often simply because they were women their science and their lives were driven by personal tragedies and shaped by seismic world events. What drove these remarkable women to cure previously incurable diseases, disprove existing theories or discover new sources of energy? Some were rewarded with the Nobel Prize for their pioneering achievements - Madame Curie, twice - others were not and, even if they had, many are not household names. Despite living during periods when the contribution of women was disregarded, if not ignored, these resilient women persevered with their research, whether creating life-saving drugs or expanding our knowledge of the cosmos. By daring to ask 'How?' and 'Why?' and persevering against the odds, each of these women, in a variety of ways, has made the world a better place. Astronomy Henrietta Leavitt (United States of America) (1868-1921) - discovered the period-luminosity relation(ship) for Cepheid variable stars, which enabled us to measure the size of our Galaxy and the Universe. Physics Lise Meitner (Austria) (1878-1968) - fled Nazi Germany in 1938, taking with her the experimental results which showed that she and Otto Hahn had split the nucleus and discovered nuclear fission. Chien-Shiung Wu (United States of America) (1912-1997) - Chinese-American who disproved one of the most accepted 'laws of nature', that not all processes can be mirrored. She showed that the 'law of parity', the idea that a left-spinning and right-spinning sub-atomic particle would behave identically, was wrong. Chemistry Marie Curie (France) (1867-1934) - the only person in history to have won Nobel prizes in two different fields of science. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (United Kingdom) (1910-1994) - British chemist who won the Nobel prize for Chemistry in 1964. Among the most prominent of a generation of great protein crystallographers. The field was revolutionized under her. She pioneered the X-ray study of large molecules of biochemical importance: the structures of cholesterol, penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin, leading to DNA structure analysis by Franklin etc. Medicine Virginia Apgar (United States of America) (1909-1974) - of Apgar Score fame. Gertrude Elion (United States of America) (1918-1999) - won the Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine in 1988 for developing some important principles for drug development. Biology Rita Levi-Montalicini (Italy) (1909-2012) - the so-called 'Lady of the Cells'. She won the Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine in 1986 for her co-discovery in 1954 of NGF (nerve growth factor). Elsie Widdowson (United Kingdom) (1906-2000) - a pioneer of the science of nutrition who was instrumental in devising the WW2 diet, in part through self-experimentation. Rachel Carson (United States of America) (1907-1964) - marine biologist and author of Silent Spring who is credited with having advanced the environmental movement.

  • B>The New York Times bestseller /b>b>'This selection of 43 stories should by all rights see Lucia Berlin as lauded as Jean Rhys or Raymond Carver' - Independent/b>The stories in A Manual for Cleaning Women make for one of the most remarkable unsung collections in twentieth-century American fiction.With extraordinary honesty and magnetism, Lucia Berlin invites us into her rich, itinerant life: the drink and the mess and the pain and the beauty and the moments of surprise and of grace. Her voice is uniquely witty, anarchic and compassionate. Celebrated for many years by those in the know, she is about to become - a decade after her death - the writer everyone is talking about. The collection will be introduced by Lydia Davis.'With Lucia Berlin we are very far away from the parlours of Boston and New York and quite far away, too, from the fiction of manners, unless we are speaking of very bad manners . . . The writer Lucia Berlin most puts me in mind of is the late Richard Yates.' - LRB, 1999

  • Tôt le matin, tard le soir, Clarissa Dalloway se surprend à écouter le clocher de Big Ben. Entre les deux carillons, une journée de printemps, une promenade en ville, le flux des états d'âme et le long monologue d'une conscience.
    Clarissa tente de « sauver cette partie de la vie, la seule précieuse, ce centre, ce ravissement, que les hommes laissent échapper, cette joie prodigieuse qui pourrait être nôtre ». Et pourtant résonne déjà dans ce livre, le plus transparent peut-être de l'oeuvre de Virginia Woolf, comme la fêlure de l'angoisse ou le vertige du suicide.

  • Emma

    Jane Austen

    Beautiful, clever, rich - and single - Emma Woodhouse is perfectly content with her life and sees no need for either love or marriage. Nothing, however, delights her more than interfering in the romantic lives of others.

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